Blog

Posted by Eilis Boyle In my first ever post for the Men, Women and Care blog I briefly touched on the role played by individual agents (primarily doctors) in lobbying for financial support for facially-wounded ex-servicemen. Three months later, analysing the ways in which different agencies interacted and negotiated the...

Throughout my time at Leeds University I have often heard the phrase “make the most of every opportunity”. Aware that studying for a PhD and a place on the Men, Women and Care Team was a fantastic opportunity, it is only recently that I have started to see my research...

Posted by Jessica Meyer I have been writing about Arnold Loosemore, V.C., on and off for the past six months.  I first encountered his story at a community event at Birley School, Sheffield where I had been contributing some workshops on post-war disability and men’s return from the war as...

As my research progress, I am beginning to understand that the relationship between religious charities and disabled ex-servicemen of the First World War is anything but simple. With the predominant absence of this topic in the religious and social history of the war, I had assumed that Christian organisations must...

From 31 January to 3 February 2017 Alexia attended the inaugural Eric Richards Symposium in British and Australasian History hosted by Flinders University’s School of History and International Relations at its city campus in Victoria Square, Adelaide, South Australia. With Adelaide’s temperatures in the mid-twenties, and having escaped Yorkshire’s sub-zero weather...

Five months into my research project, I have visited the National Archives at Kew a number of times, and am gathering a collection of interesting and useful sources for my PhD thesis. As my project deals with specific conditions, namely facial injuries and war neurosis, the process of selecting relevant...